June 2008

Joe Howe

Off The Top | by Joe Howe

 

My New Journey—My Farewell

“At forty-six years old, change is difficult but not impossible.” That’s how my recent letter to my clients started. I find myself feeling it is an appropriate way to start my final article to the readers of the Stylist.

Despite my personal joy at having the opportunity to start a new phase of my life with my partner, John, in Philadelphia, it’s with some professional sadness that my work with the Stylist will come to a conclusion. My upcoming move will force me to start building my business from the ground up. Along with that will come many hours promoting my business and getting people into my chair. I guess now is the time for me to put all the articles I’ve written into action for myself and see if the advice I’ve given to others really works.

I’m truly honored to have worked with my editor, Lisa Kind and her amazing staff who put together the Stylist for all of us to enjoy each month. My connection with the Stylist has opened the door to hearing from so many readers from many areas across the country. I’m so grateful to have had the chance to exchange an e-mail with many of our readers. I’m humbled by anyone who has thought that I was someone worthy of getting an opinion from, regarding some facet of our industry. And, I’m so thankful for having the chance to be an influence to some of you. I have welcomed and appreciated both the many kind words of thanks and the challenges to my way of thinking. I’ve found that we all share the same happy moments, prides and successes and even the same worries and failures.

We are all a part of the most wonderful career in the universe. Others might think their career is better but we know they’re wrong. We make a connection with every client who sits in our chair; to have the opportunity to do that several times a day is a gift that very few careers offer. Beside those careers governed by the medical boards, we are the only profession licensed to touch another human being. That is a magnificent power.

We don’t always know where the journey of life will lead us. In a recent conversation with my brother, Tom, he said to me, “You know, I’ve always felt like our lives were like riding our motorcycles on a highway. I prefer straight, flat roads where I can see clearly in front of me with an occasional bend in the road, whereas you seem to like winding roads with strong curves and those hills where you can’t see what’s on the other side until you’re at the top. But, no matter which road we take, we both deserve to get to where we want to go and be with the people we love.” I always knew my brother was pretty cool but this really solidified it for me.

There is a tapestry of family, friends, coworkers, clients, associates and many others who are important to me who have been a part of my decision to more forward. I cannot thank all of you properly for your support, including the readers of the Stylist, whether directly or indirectly. When time allows, I’d like to throw an article or two your way to fill you in on what it’s like to start all over again in a new city. Perhaps that will be a welcome subject for an upcoming issue. Until then, I’m off to pack a few more boxes.

I’d like to leave our readers with one of the most profound quotes that I’ve ever read. It was in the forward to a book published by renowned hair stylist, Vivian McKinder that I found quite a number of years ago. It reads, “You cannot discover new lands until you first lose sight of the shore.” I wish you all the greatest of discoveries.

Joe Howe has been a licensed cosmetologist for 23 years and self employed since 1987. He’s worked as a booth renter for the majority of his career and currently co-owns a booth rental salon in Maumee, Ohio. You can reach Joe via email at “At forty-six years old, change is difficult but not impossible.” That’s how my recent letter to my clients started. I find myself feeling it is an appropriate way to start my final article to the readers of the Stylist.

Despite my personal joy at having the opportunity to start a new phase of my life with my partner, John, in Philadelphia, it’s with some professional sadness that my work with the Stylist will come to a conclusion. My upcoming move will force me to start building my business from the ground up. Along with that will come many hours promoting my business and getting people into my chair. I guess now is the time for me to put all the articles I’ve written into action for myself and see if the advice I’ve given to others really works.

I’m truly honored to have worked with my editor, Lisa Kind and her amazing staff who put together the Stylist for all of us to enjoy each month. My connection with the Stylist has opened the door to hearing from so many readers from many areas across the country. I’m so grateful to have had the chance to exchange an e-mail with many of our readers. I’m humbled by anyone who has thought that I was someone worthy of getting an opinion from, regarding some facet of our industry. And, I’m so thankful for having the chance to be an influence to some of you. I have welcomed and appreciated both the many kind words of thanks and the challenges to my way of thinking. I’ve found that we all share the same happy moments, prides and successes and even the same worries and failures.

We are all a part of the most wonderful career in the universe. Others might think their career is better but we know they’re wrong. We make a connection with every client who sits in our chair; to have the opportunity to do that several times a day is a gift that very few careers offer. Beside those careers governed by the medical boards, we are the only profession licensed to touch another human being. That is a magnificent power.

We don’t always know where the journey of life will lead us. In a recent conversation with my brother, Tom, he said to me, “You know, I’ve always felt like our lives were like riding our motorcycles on a highway. I prefer straight, flat roads where I can see clearly in front of me with an occasional bend in the road, whereas you seem to like winding roads with strong curves and those hills where you can’t see what’s on the other side until you’re at the top. But, no matter which road we take, we both deserve to get to where we want to go and be with the people we love.” I always knew my brother was pretty cool but this really solidified it for me.

There is a tapestry of family, friends, coworkers, clients, associates and many others who are important to me who have been a part of my decision to more forward. I cannot thank all of you properly for your support, including the readers of the Stylist, whether directly or indirectly. When time allows, I’d like to throw an article or two your way to fill you in on what it’s like to start all over again in a new city. Perhaps that will be a welcome subject for an upcoming issue. Until then, I’m off to pack a few more boxes.

I’d like to leave our readers with one of the most profound quotes that I’ve ever read. It was in the forward to a book published by renowned hair stylist, Vivian McKinder that I found quite a number of years ago. It reads, “You cannot discover new lands until you first lose sight of the shore.” I wish you all the greatest of discoveries.

Joe Howe has been a licensed cosmetologist for 23 years and self employed since 1987. He’s worked as a booth renter for the majority of his career and currently co-owns a booth rental salon in Maumee, Ohio. You can reach Joe via email at howej@bex.net